Category Archives: Antiquarian

Firsts Magazine Back Issues February 1999 or When Everything Changed

fk96jmfFebruary 1999 is a fun issue – the risks, beauties and tomfoolery of purchasing collectible books on eBay is a good read nearly 20 years later. $7 includes shipping within the US and great articles including

Collecting William F. Nolan

The Many Lives of Norman Mailer “Charming, pugnacious, arrogant, brilliant, fearless, Mailer has always been controversial…”

The Power of Access “Booksellers who have access to the Internet have speedy, easy access to information about books and a place to interact…”

The Internet Follies, or Dancing on eBay

 

If you are a collector or simply love a particular author, I have a select few back issues of Firsts the Book Collector’s Magazine in very good condition.

Firsts sells these on their website; as mine are used, I will of course drop the price.

All prices include shipping and handling within the US. Outside the US, contact winecountrybooksnapa at gmail to inquire about international shipping rates.

 

 

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Filed under Antiquarian, book collecting, firsts the book collector's magazine, the book business

Firsts The Book Collector’s Magazine June 1998

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Are you a book collector or book lover? You may find our collection of vintage copies of Firsts The Book Collector’s Magazine worthwhile. Each issue is $7, shipping is free in the United States. For shipping outside the US, contact us at winecountrybooksnapa at gmail.

June 1998 Contains articles including

Worldwide Detectives “Where there are human beings, there is crime. Detectives may ply their craft at any time in history or any place on the globe. We look at three very different and far-flung detectives…”

The Firsts Guide to Grading Books Part 5 ” Firsts concludes its series by examining conditions that render a book uncollectable… incomplete and unattractive…”

Collecting Charles Willeford “When Miami Blues was first published in 1984…”

Casing K.C. Constantine “… this author has managed to guard his true identity for more than a quarter of a century while writing a series of fascinating mysteries set in fictional Rocksburg, PA…”

 

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Filed under Antiquarian, book collecting, crime, detective, firsts the book collector's magazine

Military History January; Headcount February?

Happy New Year!

In January, 89% of Wine Country Books sales were military history books. H’m, wonder what social currents are at play at this time? Train! Prepare! Be ready!

Our first sale of February is a book of essays analyzing the way African Americans have historically been portrayed in photography.

‘Tis the season when we remember that the history and current reality of our nation, our communities, our personal lives, rests on rather poor representation for Americans who did not win the demographic lottery.

One of the low risk – high yield things we can do to ease the divisions and harm done in American society is actively seek out narratives from people we don’t hear from or see much in mainstream media.

It goes hand in hand with doing the headcount, another easy step those of us distressed about injustice can take to start getting acquainted with the who what why.

Caveat! Diversity does NOT mean equality. I am just talking about gathering information over time.

I know the in-person headcount is kind of tough when many of us live in bubbles of people pretty much exclusively just like us.  That is our bellwether that something is wrong.

Perhaps we have “that one friend” or coworker who is in a wheelchair, or aged, or of African or other nonwhite descent, or dealing with loss, chronic illness, mental health issues, gay, name it. Here’s why this is not as helpful as we might think. That one unique person cannot, does not, and probably is sick to death of people asking / expecting them to, embody or speak for the experience of the larger group.

Perhaps we were raised to see people as people. Perhaps we ourselves have struggled with poverty, with abuse by institutions or persons of power in our lives, or even attack or abuse by people from one of those groups. But humanity is humanity, and we have forgotten that, somehow, and regressed into biologically programmed behaviors without examining those behaviors’ impact on ourselves and those in other walks of life.

So you can do the headcount in a low risk, high yield way, too.

Begin to notice – how much of the news and entertainment we consume features authors, characters, or narratives about and created by people who are different from us?

If a particular group- people over 50. Women (in leadership roles or college or pro athletics, this is big). People of native, indigenous, African or Latin descent. People with chronic illness, a difference in processing or physical difference, differently oriented people- is x% of the population of a city or state or nation,  shouldn’t they be getting, at minimum, x% of representation, jobs, publication, money in the media we consume, the people we hire, the people we elect to represent us, the businesses we buy from?

It takes time to absorb. And it is easy to misstep. This is because cognitive dissonance  – constantly moving goalposts regarding okay / not okay, constant difference between the dominant narrative and what individuals experience – is the rule, the very foundation of American society for so long. Divided, a few of us stand and thrive, and the rest of us fall. And some of us have been falling generation after generation after generation.

Watch. Read. Notice. Question- do your research. You’d be surprised how much you can learn just by typing your question into Google. I got the best stuff, for example, when I typed in “Why aren’t these jokes funny?”

Synthesize or assimilate information for yourself. Take your time. Best wishes and happy reading.

 

 

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Filed under 1940s, African, American, Antiquarian, military, social currents

Weathering Winter

 Winter is coming.

For koselig (“cozy” in Norwegian ) armchair vintage travel dreams on long winter evenings- beautiful black and white and color illustrations of 1958 Norway landscapes wildlife and outdoor life.

As a special bonus, the dinner menu for the Norwegian American Line’s North Cape Balkan Summer Cruise, Thursday August 7th 1958, is laid in.

 

 

email us at winecountrybooksnapa at gmail.

Complimentary copy from the Norwegian American Line North Cape-Baltic Summer Cruise, M/S Bergensfjord, Thursday August 7 1958. Large folded dinner menu card laid in. Owner name on front end paper. Color or black and white photos on every page. Linen textured and glossy pages are toned and foxed but clean and tight. Orange cloth cover with gilt flower stamp on front is clean and bright. Dust jacket has edge wear chips creases and soiling.

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Filed under 1950's, Antiquarian, ephemera, travel

The Rise and Destiny of the German Jew

The Rise and Destiny of the German Jew 1934 Union of American Hebrew Congregations

According to a review in Foreign Affairs, April 1935,

scholarly account of the Jews since 1871, the author maintaining that they will stay in Germany and adjust themselves to new conditions.

 

Text block is darkened with age. Black cloth cover is lightly faded but overall clean and clear with silver gilt and red stylized stamped round motifs relevant to Jews in Germany in 1934- swastika, menorah, industry, burning at the stake. Former owner bookplate on front end paper. Text block lightly darkened with time otherwise tight and clean. Corners lightly bumped with two corners beginning to fray.

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Filed under 1930's, Antiquarian, Germany, History, Judaica

The Waves, Virginia Woolf

Found it in my inventory today. What a gift.

Even though mine is only a First American Edition, not Hogarth Press, I can’t quite price it to sell.

In my late teens Virginia Woolf, Kate Bush, James Joyce, Billy Bragg, Joni Mitchell and Prufrock were my best friends. <heart>, as the kids say.  I still cry every time I watch the movie Orlando, one of the few movies that take liberties with a great book yet capture the point beautifully.

Hogarth House VW Waves DJ VB

 

Virginia Woolf’s The Waves with Vanessa Bell cover art. First American Edition (NOT Hogarth Press), Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1931. Dust jacket and text block darkened with age. DJ has chips and a one inch rip, is soiled and lightly price clipped. Former owner name and dealer marks on end papers.  winecountrybooksnapa at gmail – 25% discount for anyone who purchases via this blog, or make me an offer.

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Filed under Antiquarian, art, first editions, Women writers

A poem for our time – Children kept from the sun

 

New Poems Dylan Thomas winecountrybooksnapa at gmail

New Poems Dylan Thomas 1943  winecountrybooksnapa at gmail

 

Some books I just can’t let go. This one… nope.  When I opened this book, as I usually do before I list something interesting, the first poem hit me right in the chest. This beauty is mine for now.

 

Poem

 

There was a saviour
Rarer than radium,
Commoner than water, crueller than truth;
Children kept from the sun
Assembled at his tongue
To hear the golden note turn in a groove,
Prisoners of wishes locked their eyes
In the jails and studies of his keyless smiles.

The voice of children says
From a lost wilderness
There was calm to be done in his safe unrest,
When hindering man hurt
Man, animal, or bird
We hid our fears in that murdering breath,
Silence, silence to do, when earth grew loud,
In lairs and asylums of the tremendous shout.

There was glory to hear
In the churches of his tears,
Under his downy arm you sighed as he struck,
O you who could not cry
On to the ground when a man died
Put a tear for joy in the unearthly flood
And laid your cheek against a cloud-formed shell:
Now in the dark there is only yourself and myself.

Two proud, blacked brothers cry,
Winter-locked side by side,
To this inhospitable hollow year,
O we who could not stir
One lean sigh when we heard
Greed on man beating near and fire neighbour
But wailed and nested in the sky-blue wall
Now break a giant tear for the little known fall,

For the drooping of homes
That did not nurse our bones,
Brave deaths of only ones but never found,
Now see, alone in us,
Our own true strangers’ dust
Ride through the doors of our unentered house.
Exiled in us we arouse the soft,
Unclenched, armless, silk and rough love that breaks all rocks.

I didn’t find much in the way of scholarly analysis and that’s fine because to me this is very clearly about US, Americans.

We are dead because we are numb and disconnected.

We have attached ourselves to processed substitutes and intermediaries for our joy, our wellness, our communication and connection with others, our society’s laws and values.

Not all substitutes and intermediaries are always inherently bad, no more than a piece of art is somehow not as good as the item or concept it was created to reflect. They are just what they are- they do what they do, they offer what they offer.  Art, Media, Facebook, and other substitutes and intermediaries allow us to share, express, preserve, learn, coordinate.

Some, though, are death wearing a handy benign mask provided by the greed and fear that we allow to pervade our society from within our own hearts to the highest halls of learning and government.  Sometimes they are inherently evil; sometimes they are only killing us because we allow them to because it is easier to find something to numb us than to just connect.

We have been lulled by benign and evil substitutes and intermediaries into letting go of real contact, connection, nourishment, education, competence, and skill.

We are are silent when murder is done and our earth cries out and we ignore the pain of other humans and we cannot cry when we see death. The anger pain and prurient pleasure constantly whipped up by our media, portrayed for ‘entertainment’ and substituted for news by our journalists, keep us complacent and unquestioning of what is really going on and how we really need to engage.

We keep our children out of the sun, literally. They have no time to play outside, and they must not learn for themselves. They have lost the wilderness of childhood, both literally in the sense that children do not get to play outside and in the sense that we pound their joy out of them in favor of conformity, grades, good behavior, shake it off and suck it up and drive on.

We are lost but never found and there is no redemption and we are fine with that.

I have pretty much ignored John Cale, but he did set it to music if you like that sort of thing.  I am sick at heart but thankful for the message. Although, as I read it, I do wonder if, in fact, things truly are all according to plan, all good, all Maya and not worth worrying about because Heaven is always right here, within and all around us, simultaneously with the suffering and evil I, we, choose and prefer to see in every little movement, shadow, difference or change. Is my perception, or lack of it, the real problem here?

In any case, I am off to go really connect with my family in the sunshine.

 

“Poem” from poemhunter.com 

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Filed under Antiquarian, Poems and Poets, quotable, social currents