Tag Archives: United Kingdom

On Sermons, Separatism and Supremacy or The Merry Chase Part I, 1834-35

The Burning of the Houses of Parliament, J.M.W. Turner, held by Cleveland Museum of Art, copied from wikipedia’s article on The Burning of the Houses of Lords and Commons.

This week I took photos of a big batch of oldies this week, getting ready to offer them for sale.

First to lead me a merry chase was Volume VIII of  The Preacher Containing Fifty-Seven Sermons by Eminent Living Divines, July 17 1834 – May 23 1835, 

It was printed for John Chidley of London, by Bensley, Printer, Phipps-Bridge Mitcham. 

I couldn’t find any other copies of this or any volume of this series anywhere on the internet. It is listed in various old library catalogs, though. 

In the name Bensley, of Phipps-Bridge Mitcham, I smelled History of Books and Printing. I did find reference to a printer named Bensley, but it appears that if something was printed post 1799 it isn’t really that big a deal. I had to let the trail go cold and move on. 

A quick glance through The Sermons was a little more gratifying. They are such a mix of faith, hope, encouragement, social justice, and brimstone. I think matters of faith were much more present in the daily life of normal people- those who had the luxury for such thoughts, that is, and I imagine not just present but compulsory. Nonetheless, to an Episcopalian (as in, post Anglican, or Anglican Communion), a believer (loosely) in the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church of 1835 (5) (along with bits of other world religions and meditative traditions, as it suits me, but Episcopalian is my formal affiliation) it’s kinda cute, on its surface.

I can see a gentleman (or -woman) or a country vicar taking his tea and soft boiled egg (or whatever, back then) and enjoying a quiet moment to dwell on the contents of these pages before or after a long day. In the context of what was happening in England in those years, it is both heartwarming and chilling.

In 1834 Slavery was abolished in England; The Poor Law was also amended to state that the able bodied may not receive aid unless they go to the workhouse. (1) But Charles Dickens was soon to be on the scene to plead the cause of the poor. After living with poverty, desperate attempts to get his father out of debtor’s prison, and multiple interruptions to his education, his Street Sketches were published in this year. (2)

It was a year of cultural and historic turmoil. Samuel Taylor Coleridge followed Blake and Shelley to the grave, and though Wordsworth still lived, perhaps the era of poetry – idyllic, intense, reclusive, drug-enhanced, oriented toward the heart, philosophy, language and beauty- had ended, giving way to the up and coming rough and tumble of radical social action.

England had four different Prime Ministers (1). Trade unions were gaining membership and power in snowball fashion. (3) The Houses of Parliament, Westminster Palace, burnt on my birthday in this year, the biggest fire since 1666. The fire was accidental, caused by flues overheated with the burning of the outdated Tally Sticks (whatever those are), but accidental or not it was certainly timely and symbolic. (4) In 1835, protection from cruelty was extended to animals, yet the last two people to be executed for conviction of “buggery” were hanged at Newgate. (6) Talk about yer full spectrum from social justice and human decency to the lack thereof.  

The sermons themselves are actually really lovely- impressive labors of scholarly and spiritual love. The book is really old, and that is really cool. I loved my unplanned tour of this book’s cultural and literary milieu, as I do every time another one sweeps me away.  

Available at ABE and Amazon. Feel free to contact me directly at winecountrybooksnapa at gmail and make me an offer. 

The Preacher Containing Fifty-Seven Sermons by Eminent Living Divines Volume 8 VIII Nos 197 Thursday July 17 1834 – 224 Saturday May 23rd 1835
Crossman, RFG. Parsons, J. Beamish, HH. Busfield, W. et al

Published by Printed for John Chidley, London. Bensley, Printer Phipps-Bridge Mitcham (1834)
Used Hardcover
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From: Wine Country Books (Napa, CA, U.S.A.)
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Item Description: Printed for John Chidley, London. Bensley, Printer Phipps-Bridge Mitcham, 1834. Hardcover. Book Condition: Good. no jacket. Considerable foxing to brittle pages. Cloth boards with brown faux leather finish have edge wear, fading, faint staining, rips at top and bottom of spine, and fraying at corners. Cloth is separated just over halfway up the spine on the back. Fragile but whole and square and tight with all pages present. Outside of text block, deckle edges, darkly foxed. Spine label rubbed/scraped with edges torn away. Please contact seller for additional photographs or other details. Will ship bubble wrapped in a sturdy box. Bookseller Inventory # 01304

Sources: 

1. wikipedia, 1834 in the United Kingdom

2. shmoop.com, Charles Dickens Timeline 

3. wikipedia, Trade Unions in the United Kingdom

4. wikipedia, The Burning of Parliament 

5. wikipedia, Catholic Apostolic Church

6. wikipedia, 1835 in the United Kingdom

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Filed under Antiquarian, England, History, social currents, United Kingdom